Lately this is how breakfast has been looking like for me. No, I don’t eat those one by one. Instead, I dump them all in the juicer and drink up.

Now, some say fruit juice has no nutritional value and is another vehicle for unwanted sugar. Me, I just like to think that I’m getting my dose of vitamins A and C, plus healthy antioxidants, especially when I don’t really feel like eating any of the above. Drinking them is a different story. I usually toast a waffle and/or make scrambled eggs to go with this fruity concoction.

Anyway, I can’t believe I’m on Day 26 of my 30-Day Blog Challenge. I’m wondering what’s next for me and this blog. Here are some questions running through my head:

1) Should I change my blog’s name since I’ll be mostly away from New York this year? But then again, “the average age of the top 100 blogs listed at Technorati is 33.8 months,” says Darren Rowse of Problogger. “Successful blogs don’t happen overnight.”

NyMinuteNow.com is only 16 months old. My first blog, Chocolate Soundboard, reached 52 months, until I turned it private when I moved to this blog address. So if I move again, I’ll have to literally start from scratch to even make it past to NyMinuteNow’s current Technorati ranking of… 551,435. Gasp!

2) Is there a blogging future for me, at least on a professional level? I’ve been doing this for almost six years now. Although in recent months, I’ve been more vigilant and diligent to post. Rowse also says it takes time and patience for one to call blogging his or her part-time and full-time job. Time, I am lucky to have at the moment. But patience? It’s a work in progress. I do enjoy blogging so that’s a good sign.

3) What will be my regular schedule once I’m finished with the 30-Day Blog Challenge? Right now, I am thinking of blogging on weekdays, and not having anything to do with the online world on weekends (“Tech-free Sundays,” as I keep trying to convince my fiancé). I find that these days, I am more and more cooped up indoors, much to the chagrin of my waistline.

So how does one strike a balance between life in the world wide web and the real world? Or have the lines been blurred between the two, that these days, the “real world” is right where we are in cyberspace?